Friday, 24 May 2013

Playground made from trash gets children back in the swing

Playground made from trash gets children back in the swing


Ugandan eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno built an amusement park for children living in one of Kampala's slums. Ugandan eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno built an amusement park for children living in one of Kampala's slums.
(CNN) -- No sooner had Ruganzu Bruno and his troupe of fellow eco-artists arrived at Kampala's Kawempe area than their presence stirred up questions within the local community.
"What are you doing?" the startled residents asked. "Why are you using all this plastic?" they continued, baffled by the piles of waste bottles that were gradually filling a dusty compound yard in the northwestern suburb of the Ugandan capital.
What the group of artists was doing was creating "The Hand That Speaks," an enormous structure made of recycled materials to raise awareness about environmental degradation.
"We were trying to bring out the message that the hand is the one which is throwing this trash into the environment and at the same time it could be used to collect [them] and save the environment," says Bruno.
"The Hand That Speaks."
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
And once the nine artists started assembling their futuristic creation, using more than 20,000 bottles collected in the slums of Kampala, the local crowds also decided to lend a helping hand.
"At first, the community were confused but then they really loved it," says Bruno. "They were always getting us bottles."
Eco Art
That was about four years ago, when Bruno was still a student at the Kyambogo University fine art school. During that time, the talented painter and sculptor discovered that he wasn't interested in just crafting artworks that would only satisfy his creative needs.
I kind of felt a change within myself to think about others.
Ruganzu Bruno, artist
Instead, he wanted his art to have a positive impact on his community.
"When we are trying to achieve things in life we are self-centered, and as artists we tend to make work for ourselves," explains Bruno, 30.
"I kind of felt a change within myself to think about others," he adds. "From then on I could not only paint -- I decided to work on work that was beneficial to my community."
One of Ruganzu Bruno's paintings.
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
Driven by a desire to influence his surroundings, Bruno then became involved in eco-art projects, devising innovative ways to deal with Kampala's acute waste management problem.
In 2010 he founded Eco Art Uganda, a collective of artists promoting environmental awareness by transforming anything from discarded bottles and cast-aside metal to broken TVs and computers into contemporary and functional pieces of art.
"I was looking for materials that were not expensive and easily available," says the soft-spoken artist, who hails from southwest Uganda.
"I really found that this trash and rubbish could actually become a really positive way of communicating to people," adds Bruno, who's won several accolades for his work, including the Ugandan Young Achievers award 2011.
Ruganzu Bruno at the TEDx summit in Doha.
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
Amusement park
In April last year, Bruno also won the $10,000 City 2.0 Award at the TEDx summit in Doha, Qatar, for his idea to create an amusement playground for children living in Kampala's congested slums.
I think a man will always be remembered by his work.
Ruganzu Bruno, artist
Using an array of recycled materials, Bruno went on to transform a school yard in Kampala's Kireka community into a fun and safe place where children can play and learn.
The eco-park, which was completed last September, is dotted with whimsical structures attracting dozens of children each day -- from a colorful helicopter and life-size board games made of bottles to recycled swings and climbing frames crafted from old tires.
Bruno says the entire community, which lacked a recreation facility, embraced the project wholeheartedly.
"I talked to the head of the school, and together with the parents and the students, they are the ones who collected the bottles," says Bruno, who is also a lecturer in the department of Art & Design at Kyambogo University.
"So we built the playground together as a team and they know how to repair it -- this is very important in terms of sustainability."
The opening of the playground in Kireka.
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
But more importantly, Bruno, who was orphaned at a young age, says the project has had a positive impact on the children.
"The attention of children in class has improved; the number of children who are dropping out [is falling] because now they have something to keep them busy there, " he adds. "There is a really good progress and it has also helped them to express themselves in class."
Legacy
Bruno says his goal is to recreate "as many as 100" similar amusement parks in other parts of Uganda.
He is also using the prize money to grow an eco-artist loan scheme he's developed, aimed at supporting the business endeavors of creative women in Kireka.
It's all part of his continuous efforts to be an artist whose work will serve his community's needs.
"I think a man will always be remembered by his work, "says Bruno. "I'm an advocate now of the environment; I'm an advocate for play for children; I'm an artist ...who wants his work to have an effect on the people.".

Playground made from trash gets children back in the swing

Playground made from trash gets children back in the swing


Ugandan eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno built an amusement park for children living in one of Kampala's slums. Ugandan eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno built an amusement park for children living in one of Kampala's slums.
(CNN) -- No sooner had Ruganzu Bruno and his troupe of fellow eco-artists arrived at Kampala's Kawempe area than their presence stirred up questions within the local community.
"What are you doing?" the startled residents asked. "Why are you using all this plastic?" they continued, baffled by the piles of waste bottles that were gradually filling a dusty compound yard in the northwestern suburb of the Ugandan capital.
What the group of artists was doing was creating "The Hand That Speaks," an enormous structure made of recycled materials to raise awareness about environmental degradation.
"We were trying to bring out the message that the hand is the one which is throwing this trash into the environment and at the same time it could be used to collect [them] and save the environment," says Bruno.
"The Hand That Speaks."
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
And once the nine artists started assembling their futuristic creation, using more than 20,000 bottles collected in the slums of Kampala, the local crowds also decided to lend a helping hand.
"At first, the community were confused but then they really loved it," says Bruno. "They were always getting us bottles."
Eco Art
That was about four years ago, when Bruno was still a student at the Kyambogo University fine art school. During that time, the talented painter and sculptor discovered that he wasn't interested in just crafting artworks that would only satisfy his creative needs.
I kind of felt a change within myself to think about others.
Ruganzu Bruno, artist
Instead, he wanted his art to have a positive impact on his community.
"When we are trying to achieve things in life we are self-centered, and as artists we tend to make work for ourselves," explains Bruno, 30.
"I kind of felt a change within myself to think about others," he adds. "From then on I could not only paint -- I decided to work on work that was beneficial to my community."
One of Ruganzu Bruno's paintings.
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
Driven by a desire to influence his surroundings, Bruno then became involved in eco-art projects, devising innovative ways to deal with Kampala's acute waste management problem.
In 2010 he founded Eco Art Uganda, a collective of artists promoting environmental awareness by transforming anything from discarded bottles and cast-aside metal to broken TVs and computers into contemporary and functional pieces of art.
"I was looking for materials that were not expensive and easily available," says the soft-spoken artist, who hails from southwest Uganda.
"I really found that this trash and rubbish could actually become a really positive way of communicating to people," adds Bruno, who's won several accolades for his work, including the Ugandan Young Achievers award 2011.
Ruganzu Bruno at the TEDx summit in Doha.
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
Amusement park
In April last year, Bruno also won the $10,000 City 2.0 Award at the TEDx summit in Doha, Qatar, for his idea to create an amusement playground for children living in Kampala's congested slums.
I think a man will always be remembered by his work.
Ruganzu Bruno, artist
Using an array of recycled materials, Bruno went on to transform a school yard in Kampala's Kireka community into a fun and safe place where children can play and learn.
The eco-park, which was completed last September, is dotted with whimsical structures attracting dozens of children each day -- from a colorful helicopter and life-size board games made of bottles to recycled swings and climbing frames crafted from old tires.
Bruno says the entire community, which lacked a recreation facility, embraced the project wholeheartedly.
"I talked to the head of the school, and together with the parents and the students, they are the ones who collected the bottles," says Bruno, who is also a lecturer in the department of Art & Design at Kyambogo University.
"So we built the playground together as a team and they know how to repair it -- this is very important in terms of sustainability."
The opening of the playground in Kireka.
ECO ART/RUGANZU BRUNO
But more importantly, Bruno, who was orphaned at a young age, says the project has had a positive impact on the children.
"The attention of children in class has improved; the number of children who are dropping out [is falling] because now they have something to keep them busy there, " he adds. "There is a really good progress and it has also helped them to express themselves in class."
Legacy
Bruno says his goal is to recreate "as many as 100" similar amusement parks in other parts of Uganda.
He is also using the prize money to grow an eco-artist loan scheme he's developed, aimed at supporting the business endeavors of creative women in Kireka.
It's all part of his continuous efforts to be an artist whose work will serve his community's needs.
"I think a man will always be remembered by his work, "says Bruno. "I'm an advocate now of the environment; I'm an advocate for play for children; I'm an artist ...who wants his work to have an effect on the people.".

Financial, family woes of Winnie Mandela, South Africa's 'Mother of the Nation'

Financial, family woes of Winnie Mandela, South Africa's 'Mother of the Nation'


Winnie Madikizela Mandela, seen in a file photo from 13 March, 2010.
Winnie Madikizela Mandela, seen in a file photo from 13 March, 2010.

Johannesburg (CNN) -- "This shouldn't be happening" -- these were the words of a visibly nervous and frustrated sheriff of the court as he rang the outside bell and knocked at the gate belonging to a woman still considered by many in South Africa as the "mother of the nation."
Joe Maluleke and two other officials arrived at Winnie Mandela's house in Soweto on Tuesday to execute a court order granting a Johannesburg school permission to auction her belongings and pay an old debt. Among the goods meant to go under the hammer were 50 paintings, a round table, chairs and a silver tea set.
The problems started when the ex-wife of Nelson Mandela, the country's first black president and an international icon, registered her great niece, Nobantu Vutela, as a boarding student at Abbotts College in Northcliff, Johannesburg, according to court papers filed in 2008.
The accommodation fees for the year were 40,000 South African rand -- the equivalent of about $4,000 today. Winnie Mandela, 76, who earns an annual salary of around $90,000, as a member of parliament, was given six months to pay the full amount. It's unclear why she and not the girl's own parents enrolled her into the private school.
Winnie keeps to herself, but we still call her 'mother of the nation' and no-one wants to see her humiliated
Neighbor of Winnie Mandela
Despite the documents stipulating that R10,000 ($1000) be paid up front, lawyers representing the school say Mrs Mandela never paid a cent. They started instituting proceedings against her in October 2008. The case dragged on for five years. A lawyer acting on behalf of the school told CNN Mrs Mandela made her first payment last year but that she still owes nearly $5,000 with interest included. Mrs Mandela's lawyer is disputing the interest amount.
With dozens of journalists surrounding him, not a single bidder in sight, and Mrs Mandela's bodyguards stationed on the other side of the wall, Sheriff Maluleke knocked in vain. People could be seen moving around inside and outside the house, but nobody came out to let the sheriff in. At one point a car sped out of the premises using a side entrance. It is unclear who was in the car.
Maluleke was instructed by lawyers to get a locksmith and force his way into Mandela's house, but he was understandably reluctant. At one point a spectator shouted, "Why don't you climb over the wall?" The sheriff's irritated retort: "And get shot at?"
The tense standoff lasted for about two hours. Maluleke left Winnie Mandela's property empty-handed and dejected. He later admitted that the task he was expected to carry out was a difficult one. "Is it because she is the mother of the nation?" he was asked. "Exactly," he responded.
Nelson Mandela's family wine venture
Celebrating Mandela at 94
On Monday night Winnie Mandela's lawyer Yandisa Dudula had been frantically trying to stop the auction from going ahead.
"Mrs. Mandela has given me a check for R16,000 ($1,696), and another R4,000 ($212) has been given to the sheriff," he told CNN. "The auction is not necessary."
The school's lawyers insisted on getting the money in cash, failing which, they said the sale of her goods would go ahead as planned.
Confused neighbors looked on as the spectacle at Mandela's property unfolded.
"We thought she had money, it is very surprising that her goods are now having to be auctioned in order to recoup funds for a debt," one of them told CNN.
When asked what it is like to live next door "the mother of the nation," the neighbor said, "We never see her. When the old man (Nelson Mandela) lived in Soweto he would walk around, shake people's hands, greet and talk to them, he even invited us into his home."
"Winnie keeps to herself, but we still call her 'mother of the nation' and no-one wants to see her humiliated," the neighbor said.
Commentators say Winnie Mandela has become increasingly isolated, not only by her political family, the ruling African National Congress, but seemingly by her biological family as well.
"Internal tensions within the family could have played a role in no one coming to Mrs Mandela's aid," political analyst Somadoda Fikeni told CNN. "The family is fragmented and recent squabbles over money have further emphasized these divisions."
Two of Nelson Mandela's daughters -- Makaziwe Mandela and Zenani Dlamini -- are currently embroiled in a legal battle over the former political prisoner's money. They have filed court papers in an attempt to remove Mandela's longtime lawyer and friend, 84-year-old George Bizos, and others as directors of companies owned by the Mandela Trust.
The children's legal battle over their iconic father's monies has come under heavy criticism in South Africa. Bizos told local media the lawsuit is "a ploy to resuscitate the sale of Mandela's artworks" whose proceeds go to the companies at the center of the dispute.
The Mandela family is fragmented and recent squabbles over money have further emphasized these divisions
Somadoda Fikeni
Andrew Mlangeni, who was incarcerated on Robben Island with Mr Mandela, told CNN: "This is a matter that should have been resolved internally within the family."
Makaziwe recently rebutted accusations that her intentions are motivated by greed, telling the New York Times: "This issue that we are greedy, that we are wanting this money before my dad passes away is all nonsense."
The feud over Nelson Mandela's millions and now the threat of an auction at his former wife's residence underscore the contradictions and complexities in what many consider South Africa's political "royal family."
This is by no means Winnie Mandela's first brush with the law, although for years many saw her as untouchable.
The former freedom fighter was implicated in the 1980s murder of 14-year-old anti-apartheid activist Stompie Seipei. Her then-husband, Nelson Mandela, stood by her, despite a mountain of damning evidence. In 1991 she was convicted of kidnapping Seipei and for being an accessory to assault, but her six-year jail term was reduced on appeal to a fine and a suspended sentence.
In 2003 Mrs Mandela was convicted for theft and fraud in connection with an elaborate bank loan scheme where the ANC party letterhead was used to obtain loans for bogus employees including her youngest daughter Zinzi. The conviction carried a jail term, but that sentence too was suspended.
A few months ago police confirmed that they have reopened the murder case of two more former freedom fighters, allegedly last seen at her house more than 20 years ago. Their bodies were exhumed in March.
Musical tribute to Nelson Mandela
Securing the release of Nelson Mandela
Securing the release of Nelson Mandela
From prison number to fashion line
In recent years, "the mother of the nation's" influence in the country and within the ruling party has waned, and the protection she once enjoyed along with it. Last year she was voted second-last in the party's national executive committee. She had been top of the list at the previous ANC conference in 2007.
Still, respected columnist and journalist Justice Malala says he is astonished Winnie Mandela couldn't get help from a single one of her former comrades.
Malala told CNN: "It's great that she was paying for her great niece's school fees but I'm surprised that firstly she didn't feel she could raise the money from her own salary and secondly that no-one in the ANC was willing to help her. She could have also approached the Mandela Trust. Mandela has given money to president Jacob Zuma before when he was in trouble."
Perhaps the most astonishing part of the tale is why her children and grandchildren appear to have stood by and watched as threats of an auction became more serious.
Two of her grandchildren, Zaziwe and Swati Dlamini have recently launched a reality show in the U.S. called "Being Mandela." They also have a clothing line named "Long Walk to Freedom" after their grandfather's autobiography. Their mother Zenani Dlamini, Winnie's eldest daughter, is South Africa's ambassador to Argentina.
Despite the family's many ventures and connections, Winnie's lawyer says money isn't always readily available.
Winnie Mandela has often courted controversy, but she is still adored by many in South Africa.
She endured years of torture, torment, banishment and imprisonment by the apartheid regime while fighting resolutely for racial equality in the country.
And despite her legal and financial troubles over the years, very few South Africans are celebrating her downfall. Many of them took to Twitter to express their solidarity. "We cannot forget Winnie Mandela who stood tall for three decades" wrote one person.

Financial, family woes of Winnie Mandela, South Africa's 'Mother of the Nation'

By Nkepile Mabuse, CNN
May 24, 2013 -- Updated 1555 GMT (2355 HKT)
Winnie Madikizela Mandela, seen in a file photo from 13 March, 2010.
Winnie Madikizela Mandela, seen in a file photo from 13 March, 2010.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Winnie Mandela threatened with having her belongings sold off to pay school fees
  • Mandela, ex-wife of South African icon Nelson Mandela, is regarded by many as "mother of the nation"
  • Commentators say Winnie Mandela increasingly isolated from political and biological families
  • Nelson Mandela's family embroiled in legal battle over former political prisoner's money
Johannesburg (CNN) -- "This shouldn't be happening" -- these were the words of a visibly nervous and frustrated sheriff of the court as he rang the outside bell and knocked at the gate belonging to a woman still considered by many in South Africa as the "mother of the nation."
Joe Maluleke and two other officials arrived at Winnie Mandela's house in Soweto on Tuesday to execute a court order granting a Johannesburg school permission to auction her belongings and pay an old debt. Among the goods meant to go under the hammer were 50 paintings, a round table, chairs and a silver tea set.
The problems started when the ex-wife of Nelson Mandela, the country's first black president and an international icon, registered her great niece, Nobantu Vutela, as a boarding student at Abbotts College in Northcliff, Johannesburg, according to court papers filed in 2008.
The accommodation fees for the year were 40,000 South African rand -- the equivalent of about $4,000 today. Winnie Mandela, 76, who earns an annual salary of around $90,000, as a member of parliament, was given six months to pay the full amount. It's unclear why she and not the girl's own parents enrolled her into the private school.
Winnie keeps to herself, but we still call her 'mother of the nation' and no-one wants to see her humiliated
Neighbor of Winnie Mandela
Despite the documents stipulating that R10,000 ($1000) be paid up front, lawyers representing the school say Mrs Mandela never paid a cent. They started instituting proceedings against her in October 2008. The case dragged on for five years. A lawyer acting on behalf of the school told CNN Mrs Mandela made her first payment last year but that she still owes nearly $5,000 with interest included. Mrs Mandela's lawyer is disputing the interest amount.
With dozens of journalists surrounding him, not a single bidder in sight, and Mrs Mandela's bodyguards stationed on the other side of the wall, Sheriff Maluleke knocked in vain. People could be seen moving around inside and outside the house, but nobody came out to let the sheriff in. At one point a car sped out of the premises using a side entrance. It is unclear who was in the car.
Maluleke was instructed by lawyers to get a locksmith and force his way into Mandela's house, but he was understandably reluctant. At one point a spectator shouted, "Why don't you climb over the wall?" The sheriff's irritated retort: "And get shot at?"
The tense standoff lasted for about two hours. Maluleke left Winnie Mandela's property empty-handed and dejected. He later admitted that the task he was expected to carry out was a difficult one. "Is it because she is the mother of the nation?" he was asked. "Exactly," he responded.
Outrage at pictures of ailing Mandela
2012: Nelson Mandela's early years
Nelson Mandela's family wine venture
Celebrating Mandela at 94
On Monday night Winnie Mandela's lawyer Yandisa Dudula had been frantically trying to stop the auction from going ahead.
"Mrs. Mandela has given me a check for R16,000 ($1,696), and another R4,000 ($212) has been given to the sheriff," he told CNN. "The auction is not necessary."
The school's lawyers insisted on getting the money in cash, failing which, they said the sale of her goods would go ahead as planned.
Confused neighbors looked on as the spectacle at Mandela's property unfolded.
"We thought she had money, it is very surprising that her goods are now having to be auctioned in order to recoup funds for a debt," one of them told CNN.
When asked what it is like to live next door "the mother of the nation," the neighbor said, "We never see her. When the old man (Nelson Mandela) lived in Soweto he would walk around, shake people's hands, greet and talk to them, he even invited us into his home."
"Winnie keeps to herself, but we still call her 'mother of the nation' and no-one wants to see her humiliated," the neighbor said.
Commentators say Winnie Mandela has become increasingly isolated, not only by her political family, the ruling African National Congress, but seemingly by her biological family as well.
"Internal tensions within the family could have played a role in no one coming to Mrs Mandela's aid," political analyst Somadoda Fikeni told CNN. "The family is fragmented and recent squabbles over money have further emphasized these divisions."
Two of Nelson Mandela's daughters -- Makaziwe Mandela and Zenani Dlamini -- are currently embroiled in a legal battle over the former political prisoner's money. They have filed court papers in an attempt to remove Mandela's longtime lawyer and friend, 84-year-old George Bizos, and others as directors of companies owned by the Mandela Trust.
The children's legal battle over their iconic father's monies has come under heavy criticism in South Africa. Bizos told local media the lawsuit is "a ploy to resuscitate the sale of Mandela's artworks" whose proceeds go to the companies at the center of the dispute.
The Mandela family is fragmented and recent squabbles over money have further emphasized these divisions
Somadoda Fikeni
Andrew Mlangeni, who was incarcerated on Robben Island with Mr Mandela, told CNN: "This is a matter that should have been resolved internally within the family."
Makaziwe recently rebutted accusations that her intentions are motivated by greed, telling the New York Times: "This issue that we are greedy, that we are wanting this money before my dad passes away is all nonsense."
The feud over Nelson Mandela's millions and now the threat of an auction at his former wife's residence underscore the contradictions and complexities in what many consider South Africa's political "royal family."
This is by no means Winnie Mandela's first brush with the law, although for years many saw her as untouchable.
The former freedom fighter was implicated in the 1980s murder of 14-year-old anti-apartheid activist Stompie Seipei. Her then-husband, Nelson Mandela, stood by her, despite a mountain of damning evidence. In 1991 she was convicted of kidnapping Seipei and for being an accessory to assault, but her six-year jail term was reduced on appeal to a fine and a suspended sentence.
In 2003 Mrs Mandela was convicted for theft and fraud in connection with an elaborate bank loan scheme where the ANC party letterhead was used to obtain loans for bogus employees including her youngest daughter Zinzi. The conviction carried a jail term, but that sentence too was suspended.
A few months ago police confirmed that they have reopened the murder case of two more former freedom fighters, allegedly last seen at her house more than 20 years ago. Their bodies were exhumed in March.
Musical tribute to Nelson Mandela
Securing the release of Nelson Mandela
Securing the release of Nelson Mandela
From prison number to fashion line
In recent years, "the mother of the nation's" influence in the country and within the ruling party has waned, and the protection she once enjoyed along with it. Last year she was voted second-last in the party's national executive committee. She had been top of the list at the previous ANC conference in 2007.
Still, respected columnist and journalist Justice Malala says he is astonished Winnie Mandela couldn't get help from a single one of her former comrades.
Malala told CNN: "It's great that she was paying for her great niece's school fees but I'm surprised that firstly she didn't feel she could raise the money from her own salary and secondly that no-one in the ANC was willing to help her. She could have also approached the Mandela Trust. Mandela has given money to president Jacob Zuma before when he was in trouble."
Perhaps the most astonishing part of the tale is why her children and grandchildren appear to have stood by and watched as threats of an auction became more serious.
Two of her grandchildren, Zaziwe and Swati Dlamini have recently launched a reality show in the U.S. called "Being Mandela." They also have a clothing line named "Long Walk to Freedom" after their grandfather's autobiography. Their mother Zenani Dlamini, Winnie's eldest daughter, is South Africa's ambassador to Argentina.
Despite the family's many ventures and connections, Winnie's lawyer says money isn't always readily available.
Winnie Mandela has often courted controversy, but she is still adored by many in South Africa.
She endured years of torture, torment, banishment and imprisonment by the apartheid regime while fighting resolutely for racial equality in the country.
And despite her legal and financial troubles over the years, very few South Africans are celebrating her downfall. Many of them took to Twitter to express their solidarity. "We cannot forget Winnie Mandela who stood tall for three decades" wrote one person.

Financial, family woes of Winnie Mandela, South Africa's 'Mother of the Nation'

By Nkepile Mabuse, CNN
May 24, 2013 -- Updated 1555 GMT (2355 HKT)
Winnie Madikizela Mandela, seen in a file photo from 13 March, 2010.
Winnie Madikizela Mandela, seen in a file photo from 13 March, 2010.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Winnie Mandela threatened with having her belongings sold off to pay school fees
  • Mandela, ex-wife of South African icon Nelson Mandela, is regarded by many as "mother of the nation"
  • Commentators say Winnie Mandela increasingly isolated from political and biological families
  • Nelson Mandela's family embroiled in legal battle over former political prisoner's money
Johannesburg (CNN) -- "This shouldn't be happening" -- these were the words of a visibly nervous and frustrated sheriff of the court as he rang the outside bell and knocked at the gate belonging to a woman still considered by many in South Africa as the "mother of the nation."
Joe Maluleke and two other officials arrived at Winnie Mandela's house in Soweto on Tuesday to execute a court order granting a Johannesburg school permission to auction her belongings and pay an old debt. Among the goods meant to go under the hammer were 50 paintings, a round table, chairs and a silver tea set.
The problems started when the ex-wife of Nelson Mandela, the country's first black president and an international icon, registered her great niece, Nobantu Vutela, as a boarding student at Abbotts College in Northcliff, Johannesburg, according to court papers filed in 2008.
The accommodation fees for the year were 40,000 South African rand -- the equivalent of about $4,000 today. Winnie Mandela, 76, who earns an annual salary of around $90,000, as a member of parliament, was given six months to pay the full amount. It's unclear why she and not the girl's own parents enrolled her into the private school.
Winnie keeps to herself, but we still call her 'mother of the nation' and no-one wants to see her humiliated
Neighbor of Winnie Mandela
Despite the documents stipulating that R10,000 ($1000) be paid up front, lawyers representing the school say Mrs Mandela never paid a cent. They started instituting proceedings against her in October 2008. The case dragged on for five years. A lawyer acting on behalf of the school told CNN Mrs Mandela made her first payment last year but that she still owes nearly $5,000 with interest included. Mrs Mandela's lawyer is disputing the interest amount.
With dozens of journalists surrounding him, not a single bidder in sight, and Mrs Mandela's bodyguards stationed on the other side of the wall, Sheriff Maluleke knocked in vain. People could be seen moving around inside and outside the house, but nobody came out to let the sheriff in. At one point a car sped out of the premises using a side entrance. It is unclear who was in the car.
Maluleke was instructed by lawyers to get a locksmith and force his way into Mandela's house, but he was understandably reluctant. At one point a spectator shouted, "Why don't you climb over the wall?" The sheriff's irritated retort: "And get shot at?"
The tense standoff lasted for about two hours. Maluleke left Winnie Mandela's property empty-handed and dejected. He later admitted that the task he was expected to carry out was a difficult one. "Is it because she is the mother of the nation?" he was asked. "Exactly," he responded.
Outrage at pictures of ailing Mandela
2012: Nelson Mandela's early years
Nelson Mandela's family wine venture
Celebrating Mandela at 94
On Monday night Winnie Mandela's lawyer Yandisa Dudula had been frantically trying to stop the auction from going ahead.
"Mrs. Mandela has given me a check for R16,000 ($1,696), and another R4,000 ($212) has been given to the sheriff," he told CNN. "The auction is not necessary."
The school's lawyers insisted on getting the money in cash, failing which, they said the sale of her goods would go ahead as planned.
Confused neighbors looked on as the spectacle at Mandela's property unfolded.
"We thought she had money, it is very surprising that her goods are now having to be auctioned in order to recoup funds for a debt," one of them told CNN.
When asked what it is like to live next door "the mother of the nation," the neighbor said, "We never see her. When the old man (Nelson Mandela) lived in Soweto he would walk around, shake people's hands, greet and talk to them, he even invited us into his home."
"Winnie keeps to herself, but we still call her 'mother of the nation' and no-one wants to see her humiliated," the neighbor said.
Commentators say Winnie Mandela has become increasingly isolated, not only by her political family, the ruling African National Congress, but seemingly by her biological family as well.
"Internal tensions within the family could have played a role in no one coming to Mrs Mandela's aid," political analyst Somadoda Fikeni told CNN. "The family is fragmented and recent squabbles over money have further emphasized these divisions."
Two of Nelson Mandela's daughters -- Makaziwe Mandela and Zenani Dlamini -- are currently embroiled in a legal battle over the former political prisoner's money. They have filed court papers in an attempt to remove Mandela's longtime lawyer and friend, 84-year-old George Bizos, and others as directors of companies owned by the Mandela Trust.
The children's legal battle over their iconic father's monies has come under heavy criticism in South Africa. Bizos told local media the lawsuit is "a ploy to resuscitate the sale of Mandela's artworks" whose proceeds go to the companies at the center of the dispute.
The Mandela family is fragmented and recent squabbles over money have further emphasized these divisions
Somadoda Fikeni
Andrew Mlangeni, who was incarcerated on Robben Island with Mr Mandela, told CNN: "This is a matter that should have been resolved internally within the family."
Makaziwe recently rebutted accusations that her intentions are motivated by greed, telling the New York Times: "This issue that we are greedy, that we are wanting this money before my dad passes away is all nonsense."
The feud over Nelson Mandela's millions and now the threat of an auction at his former wife's residence underscore the contradictions and complexities in what many consider South Africa's political "royal family."
This is by no means Winnie Mandela's first brush with the law, although for years many saw her as untouchable.
The former freedom fighter was implicated in the 1980s murder of 14-year-old anti-apartheid activist Stompie Seipei. Her then-husband, Nelson Mandela, stood by her, despite a mountain of damning evidence. In 1991 she was convicted of kidnapping Seipei and for being an accessory to assault, but her six-year jail term was reduced on appeal to a fine and a suspended sentence.
In 2003 Mrs Mandela was convicted for theft and fraud in connection with an elaborate bank loan scheme where the ANC party letterhead was used to obtain loans for bogus employees including her youngest daughter Zinzi. The conviction carried a jail term, but that sentence too was suspended.
A few months ago police confirmed that they have reopened the murder case of two more former freedom fighters, allegedly last seen at her house more than 20 years ago. Their bodies were exhumed in March.
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Securing the release of Nelson Mandela
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In recent years, "the mother of the nation's" influence in the country and within the ruling party has waned, and the protection she once enjoyed along with it. Last year she was voted second-last in the party's national executive committee. She had been top of the list at the previous ANC conference in 2007.
Still, respected columnist and journalist Justice Malala says he is astonished Winnie Mandela couldn't get help from a single one of her former comrades.
Malala told CNN: "It's great that she was paying for her great niece's school fees but I'm surprised that firstly she didn't feel she could raise the money from her own salary and secondly that no-one in the ANC was willing to help her. She could have also approached the Mandela Trust. Mandela has given money to president Jacob Zuma before when he was in trouble."
Perhaps the most astonishing part of the tale is why her children and grandchildren appear to have stood by and watched as threats of an auction became more serious.
Two of her grandchildren, Zaziwe and Swati Dlamini have recently launched a reality show in the U.S. called "Being Mandela." They also have a clothing line named "Long Walk to Freedom" after their grandfather's autobiography. Their mother Zenani Dlamini, Winnie's eldest daughter, is South Africa's ambassador to Argentina.
Despite the family's many ventures and connections, Winnie's lawyer says money isn't always readily available.
Winnie Mandela has often courted controversy, but she is still adored by many in South Africa.
She endured years of torture, torment, banishment and imprisonment by the apartheid regime while fighting resolutely for racial equality in the country.
And despite her legal and financial troubles over the years, very few South Africans are celebrating her downfall. Many of them took to Twitter to express their solidarity. "We cannot forget Winnie Mandela who stood tall for three decades" wrote one person.

Pellegrini joins manager merry-go-round after announcing he will leave Malaga

Pellegrini joins manager merry-go-round after announcing he will leave Malaga


Manuel Pellegrini is a qualified engineer but he is now engineering his next move in a long footballing career.
Manuel Pellegrini is a qualified engineer but he is now engineering his next move in a long footballing career.

(CNN) -- Malaga coach Manuel Pellegrini has added his name to May's managerial merry-go-round by announcing he is leaving the Spanish club at the end of this season.
The Chilean has been linked to the top job at Manchester City after the English Premier League club dismissed Italian Roberto Mancini earlier this month.
Pellegrini had a one-season spell in charge of Real Madrid before joining Malaga in 2010, shortly after Qatar's Sheikh Abdullah Bin Nasser Al-Thani bought the club.
This season the 59-year-old guided "Los Boquerones" to the heady heights of the Champions League quarterfinals, losing to one of this weekend's finalists, Borussia Dortmund.
But Pellegrini said he was now standing down for "sporting reasons" -- not because of the club's financial problems. Malaga confirmed to CNN that the head coach would be leaving at the end of the season.
The Spanish club agreed Pellegrini could leave despite having two years left on his contract.
"My coaching staff and I are separating from Malaga but our union with this city will be eternal," Pellegrini said in a social address to the Malaga Provisional Council.
"We leave the club qualified for Europe with the mission accomplished. We had a time with the club that was very rewarding."
Pellegrini plans to stay at the helm for Malaga's final two matches. The club, sixth in the La Liga standings, plays Deportivo La Coruna at home before closing the season against Barcelona at the Nou Camp on June 1.
"Sunday will be my last match at La Rosaleda and will be very exciting for me," Pellegrini said.
"I'm not leaving due to the matter of money but looking for a project that allows me to develop my profession conveniently."
Pellegrini continued in a statement on the club's website: "Everyone has the right and obligation to follow their chosen path, and Malaga must do the same. The club requires a realistic project next season.
"Malaga had a past without Manuel Pellegrini, and will also have a future without Manuel Pellegrini
"I will be eternally grateful to the owners of the club, who always had blind faith in me. The most important foundation of this club is the strength and support from the fans."
It's not only on the Costa del Sol that waves are being felt in the managerial market.
Along with Mancini's departure, Everton manager David Moyes will replace Alex Ferguson at EPL rival Manchester United.
Carlo Ancelotti has indicated he wants to leave French champion Paris Saint-Germain, possibly to replace outgoing Real Madrid boss Jose Mourinho, who in turn has been linked with a return to Chelsea in place of Rafa Benitez.
 
 
Tony Pulis has also left EPL side Stoke City while Roberto Martinez is said to be considering his position at Wigan following relegation from England's top flight.
As Pellegrini pondered his future, UEFA ruled on Malaga's eligibility to compete in European competitions on Wednesday.
Malaga fell foul of the European governing body's Financial Fair Play rules in 2012 and was subsequently handed a season-long ban from its tournaments.
Malaga owed player wages and has debts with other football sides as well as the Spanish tax authorities, claimed UEFA.
But UEFA's Club Financial Control Body (CFCB) confirmed that Malaga has now fulfilled conditions imposed upon it and a second year of "suspended sanctions that had been imposed will not apply."
Malaga was allowed to continue in this season's Champions League but is not eligible to compete in next season's Europa League even if the team qualifies for one of the three places on offer to Spanish sides.
The club is awaiting a decision, due next month, on its appeal against this ban to the global Court of Arbitration for Sport.
Malaga was reported to have splashed out $80 million in 2012 assembling a squad containing big names like Spain's double European champion Santiago Cazorla and Dutch defender Joris Mathijsen, but the many top players left as the club cut its costs.

Dortmund's Gotze to miss Champions League final against future employers

Dortmund's Gotze to miss Champions League final against future employers


Borussia Dortmund's Mario Gotze will miss Saturday's Champions League final against future employers Bayern Munich because of a hamstring injury. Borussia Dortmund's Mario Gotze will miss Saturday's Champions League final against future employers Bayern Munich because of a hamstring injury.
(CNN) -- The answer to the question will now never be known -- for many football fans had been wondering how Borussia Dortmund's Mario Gotze would fare when taking on future employers Bayern Munich in Saturday's Champions League final at Wembley.
After both German teams booked their place in the final, supporters, journalists and former players had asked how the 20-year-old would handle a situation whereby he had the chance to shatter Bayern's Champions League dream but such thoughts now lie idle.
Last month, it was announced the midfielder was joining Dortmund's biggest Bundesliga rivals after the recently-crowned German champions activated his release clause with a bid of $47 million.
The move was criticized by many Dortmund fans, disappointed that a player who had been developed by the club's academy since the age of 8 was being lost so readily and by the timing of the news.
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The announcement came on the eve of the opening leg of Dortmund's Champions League semifinal with Real Madrid, which the 2012 Bundesliga champions ultimately won 4-3 on aggregate to reach their first final in 16 years.
Gotze was highly influential in the first leg but tore his hamstring 14 minutes into Dortmund's 2-0 defeat in the return fixture at the Bernabeu on April 30 -- a game that has proved to be his last for the club.
"It was my big aim to play in the final and I have been working hard to reach that in the last few weeks," Dortmund's website quoted the German international as saying on Wednesday.
"I am incredibly sorry that I can't help the team in this really important game. I have full confidence in the team and will of course be going to London to support the boys from the sidelines."
The attacking midfielder had maintained hopes of playing in London until Tuesday, when he managed an hour of training in his first full session since April until an adverse reaction curtailed his dream -- and so perhaps his chances of repairing his damaged relationship with some fans.
For while the absence of Dortmund's main playmaker represents a major tactical blow for coach Jurgen Klopp, it has been welcomed by a section of the club's supporters.
The intensity of feeling following the April announcement found some fans burning a replica of his Dortmund jersey in online videos and others labeling him 'Judas' among other protests.
When hosting Bayern in a league match on May 4 that ended 1-1, Dortmund fans unveiled a massive banner reading 'The quest for cash reveals how much heart you really have, get lost Goetze'.
"What you find on the internet is that some Dortmund fans are not that disappointed that Gotze cannot play," said Peter Penders, a sports journalist with German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine.
"A lot of them never wanted to see him in a Dortmund jersey again as they no longer saw him as the club's player after he signed for Bayern."
"He had grown up at Borussia Dortmund and was seen as a player wholly created by Borussia Dortmund, which is why they were so disappointed."
When the transfer was announced, the charismatic Klopp revealed that Gotze's departure had hinged on the fact that former Barcelona Pep Guardiola, who will take charge of Bayern after this season, had identified him as a key player.
"The reason Gotze is leaving? He is the favorite transfer of Guardiola," Klopp told reporters. "So if it's anyone's fault, it's mine. I cannot make myself 15 centimeters smaller and learn Spanish. Gotze wants to work with this extraordinary coach that is Guardiola."
Despite the apathy of some supporters, Dortmund - who finished runner-up to Bayern in this season's German championship -- will miss the creativity of a player with 12 league goals and 13 assists in both the Bundesliga and Champions League this season.
"Gotze's absence is a major problem in attack because they have to change some other things," added Penders.
"Perhaps Marco Reus will take his position behind striker Robert Lewandowski, with Kevin Grosskreutz filling Reus' usual position on the wing."
Dortmund are also waiting on the fitness of defender Mats Hummels, who is receiving intense treatment on the ankle he damaged in Saturday's surprise home defeat by Hoffenheim.
Meanwhile, one of the players Gotze will link up with next season says Bayern must atone for final defeats to Inter Milan in 2010 and to Chelsea in their own stadium last year.
"We have to win for the fans, the club and the whole team," said Franck Ribery, who joined the Bavarian club six years ago.
"This is our third time, we have more experience, know what it means to play in a final, so it's nothing new for us, everyone knows what they have to do and how we have to play against Dortmund.
"The defeat to Inter was hard, but the loss to Chelsea really hurt, it was a huge shock for everyone," added the French winger.

UEFA to monitor London security ahead of Champions League final

UEFA to monitor London security ahead of Champions League final


The Champions League final is being staged in London where security has come into focus ahead of the big match
The Champions League final is being staged in London where security has come into focus ahead of the big match

(CNN) -- European football's governing body UEFA says it will continue to monitor security ahead of Saturday's Champions League final in London.
The British government held an emergency meeting on Thursday following the daylight murder of a British soldier in the capital the previous day.
Owned by the English Football Association, Wembley is hosting the final of the prestigious European club competition for the second time in two years, but on match day it is UEFA which assumes responsibility for the stadium in north London.
UEFA said it was "confident" that the all-German final between Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund would not be affected by wider events in London.
"We obviously have a lot of security measures in place," a UEFA spokeswoman told CNN. "We are confident they will guarantee there is a positive atmosphere in the city as well as inside the stadium.
"As for each final we contact the [local] police and security is in their hands. We will of course be monitoring the situation.
"Each time we hold a final we discuss various security matters [with the venues] where we discuss the number of stewards, security and police officers required."
London's Metropolitan Police Service has not changed the "threat level" for the final since the murder, though the police will continue to keep their plans under constant review.
"In light of events in Woolwich we have looked at our policing plan for the Champions League final," said Chief Superintendent Julia Pendry, who is heading up the policing operation for the final, said in a statement.
"We would like to reassure travelling fans and visitors to London that there is nothing at this stage to suggest any threat to this event and an appropriate policing response will be in place to ensure the safety and security of those who attend the event.
"We are working closely with British Transport Police and our other emergency service partners and as always our plans are flexible and kept under continuous review."
Firearms officers are used as a response service by the Metropolitan Police Service and would not routinely be on patrol at events such as Champions League finals.
Security in London has come under renewed focus after a British soldier was brutally killed close to barracks in Woolwich, south London on Wednesday.
There has been increased security at army bases around London amid fears of additional attacks, but Prime Minister David Cameron urged people to "go about their normal lives."
Borussia Dortmund has not changed its advice to fans traveling to London ahead of Saturday's match.
The club has sold all of its allocation of 25,000 tickets for the London final after 500,000 had applied for tickets, though Dortmund did not know how many fans were planning to travel to the UK without a ticket for the match.
Bayern Munich was not immediately available for comment.
The capacity of Wembley Stadium for the match will be 86,000, with each team receiving 25,000 seats with 9,000 going on sale to fans around the world.
Wembley will be open to fans from 1630 (BST) ahead of the Champions League finale.

UEFA steps up racism fight with tougher sanctions

UEFA steps up racism fight with tougher sanctions


AC Milan midfielder Kevin Prince-Boateng walked off the pitch in January after being subjected to racist abuse.
AC Milan midfielder Kevin Prince-Boateng walked off the pitch in January after being subjected to racist abuse.

(CNN) -- After a year where football's name has been dragged through the mud by a series of racism controversies, UEFA has announced that players and officials will face a 10-match ban if found guilty of racist abuse.
Following a meeting of UEFA's executive committee in London Thursday, the European governing body confirmed the bans would apply to its own competitions, while other national associations remain free to decide on their own punishments.
The new tougher sanction comes just over a week after the English Football Association drew criticism for its plans to introduce a minimum five-match suspension for racism.
"An association should adopt the same or similar measures. UEFA has always acted in a way to try to convince people rather than impose," said UEFA general secretary Gianni Infantino at a press conference.
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"I don't think you measure the way of fighting against racism in one simple measure and sanction.
"The way I read the FA's decision is that it could be five matches and it could also be 15. The FA is sure their way of regulating is more correct for England.
"It's their decision but it doesn't mean they do more or less than us. Everyone has to do what they can do in this field.
"The FA is autonomous and knows best what is best for England to do in the fight against racism. It is probably one of the countries where the most has been done."
According to details released by UEFA, clubs and national side's whose fans are found guilty of racist abuse will be punished with a partial stadium closure as a first offense, while a second offense will lead to a complete closure.
Only last week, AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli told CNN that he was prepared to walk off the pitch if racially abused once again.
The Italy striker was subjected to "monkey chants" by visiting fans during Milan's goalless draw with Roma at the San Siro.
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"I always said that if it (racism) happened in the stadium I will just do like 'nobody says nothing and I don't care,'" Balotelli told CNN.
"But this time I think I've changed my mind a little bit. If it's going to happen one more time, then I'm going to leave the pitch because it's so stupid."
Balotelli is not the first player to have suffered racial abuse while playing for AC Milan -- one of the most revered clubs in Europe having won 18 league titles and seven European Cups.
In January, midfielder Kevin Prince-Boateng walked off the pitch in disgust after being racially abused by a section of supporters during a friendly game at Pro Patria.
Since then, UEFA has stated its intention to introduce stricter punishments for those found guilty of racism after being heavily criticized in the past for being too lenient.
The new rules are intended to curb racism at clubs such as Italian club Lazio, which has been charged four times by UEFA so far this season, with the Italian side paying $300,000 in fines.
Europe's governing body also plans to introduce the implementation of biological passports for players in the future.
Biological profiles are built up by collating an athlete's drug test results over time, therefore making it easier to detect differences which could indicate the use of a banned substance.
A new UEFA anti-doping program will also examine 900 samples given in the past five years to decipher whether steroids have been used.
On Friday, UEFA is expected to announce changes to the Europa League with the winner set to be granted a place in the Champions League from 2015.
Meanwhile, Berlin's Olympic Stadium will host the 2015 Champions League final, while Warsaw will welcome the finalists of the Europa League.

No repeat of 2012 final as Nadal and Djokovic drawn in same half at French

No repeat of 2012 final as Nadal and Djokovic drawn in same half at French


Rafael Nadal celebrates his French Open title success in 2012 with runner-up Novak Djokovic.
Rafael Nadal celebrates his French Open title success in 2012 with runner-up Novak Djokovic.

(CNN) -- There will be no repeat of the 2012 men's singles final at the French Open after defending champion Rafael Nadal was drawn Friday in the same half as No.1-ranked Novak Djokovic for this year's second grand slam of the season.
It means the pair are likely to face each other in the semifinals at Roland Garros as Nadal bids for an eighth crown and reigning Australian Open champion Djokovic attempts to take the French Open for the first time.
With Andy Murray withdrawing earlier this week through injury, Nadal has been promoted to third seed.
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The Spaniard spent nearly eight months on the sidelines himself but since his return has won six tournaments, including back to back Masters titles in Madrid and Rome, lifting him up the rankings.
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He shrugged off the possibility of facing Djokovic in the last four rather than the final.
"It is what it is. If he and I are not number one and two in the world, then this can happen," Nadal told the official French Open website.
"But the tournament starts with the first round, and I'm sure both of us know we have a hard path before that."
Nadal will open proceedings against Germany's Daniel Brands, but a potential third round match would pit him against Lukas Rosol, who shocked him at last year's Wimbledon ahead of his lengthy injury layoff.
Djokovic, who beat Nadal in April in the final of the Monte Carlo Masters, will play Belgium's David Goffin in the first round.
In the other half, second seed Roger Federer will play qualifiers in this first two matches, with home hope Jo-Wilfried Tsonga a likely quarterfinal opponent and fourth seed David Ferrer of Spain in the semifinals.
The women's draw has been kind to No.1 Serena Williams, who will begin her campaign against Anna Tatishvili.
Defending champion and second seed Maria Sharapova has the tougher test, with Australian Open winner and third seed Victoria Azarenka in her half of the draw.
But the Russia superstar is just proud to be back with the clay court grand slam under her belt.
"It's very meaningful to come back as defending champion," she said.
"Of course, there's always a bit of pressure coming back. But the draw looks good."
Action gets underway Sunday, but in the qualifying tournament Friday there was defeat for former World No.9 Andrea Petkovic.
The German has been plagued by injuries since reaching the quarterfinals in Paris two years ago and went out to China' s Yi-Miao Zhou after three grueling sets.

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